Despite long shutdown, YM-YWHA Looks to Future

Dec. 1, 2020

By JANICE ARNOLD

MONTREAL — A 110th anniversary should be an occasion for celebration, but the Sylvan Adams YM-YWHA has had to postpone the party until COVID is history.

Since mid-March, the Y has been open just one week and the current red-zone restrictions preventing it from normal operations will remain in place until Jan. 11.

At the Y’s virtual annual general meeting on Nov. 24, the association’s leaders nevertheless struck an optimistic tone, as they looked to the more distant future.

Outgoing president Rick Rubin, who completed a two-year term, reported that pre-pandemic, the Y’s fortunes were looking up. When he took the helm, its facilities were aging and could not compete with other fitness centres in the city. Membership was declining.

The Y Country Camp, opened in 1962, was also becoming outdated and losing its appeal.

A generous donation from businessman Sylvan Adams, formerly of Montreal and now living in Israel, helped reverse the downward trend. Major renovations to the fitness facilities have been completed and a kosher cafeteria been added.

The Y is working with Federation CJA, of which it is an agency, to “get on the path of sustainability…The Y is an undeniable requirement for our community,” said Rubin. “I am confident that when we reopen we will rival and surpass any other facility in Montreal.”

Although the Quebec government permitted gyms to reopen in June, the Y remained shuttered until Sept. 30, the day before Montreal went into a 28-day partial lockdown in response to a surging second wave of the coronavirus. Gyms were added to the list of places to be closed on Oct. 8.

Revenue dropped to almost zero, Rubin said, and senior staff had their salaries reduced.

Treasurer Jeffrey Kadanoff reported that by the fiscal year ending on May 31, the Y had incurred a deficit of just under $673,000.

The Y Country Camp in the Laurentians, like other overnight camps, was not permitted to run a regular program this summer.

The downtime was used to revamp its facilities and programming, Rubin said, and the camp is looking forward to reopening next season and enrolment should be high, judging by the response to early-bird registration.

Incoming president Tina Apfeld said, “My vision is that the Y be the centre of the Jewish community. The Y should be welcoming to all members of the Jewish community, whatever their age or affiliation…The Y will not only survive but flourish; our children and grandchildren will also consider it a second home.”

Besides enhancing its recreational features, Apfeld said the Y, with support from the Jewish Community Foundation of Montreal, will be increasing its Jewish programming, including creating an after-school program for children who do not attend a Jewish day school.

She said the Y has consulted with the management firm EY on it financial situation and will soon be making public a sustainability plan. “We are reimagining and repositioning the Y for the future.”

The new Y chief executive officer is Elyse Rosen, replacing Marla Gold who retired in June after seven years.

A longtime Y member, Rosen said she chose to leave her law practice partly because she is the daughter of Holocaust survivors and feels a duty to work toward Jewish continuity.

“The Y must be open and inclusive, where young and old, Ashkenazi and Sephardi, able and disabled, observant or not can come together, a place that builds Jewish identity and inspires engagement in Jewish life…We are going to come out of this crisis stronger than ever.”