Reservist Should be Tossed for Racist Ties, Navy Agrees

Dec. 15, 2020

By STEVE ARNOLD

Royal Canadian Navy commanders are recommending a reservist with a history of ties to a racist organization be discharged from the military.

Navy leaders have told Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center the decision to recommend tossing Calgary-based Leading Seaman Boris Mihajlovic from the Navy was made following a command-level review of his case, including a previous decision to reinstate the sailor.

“We strongly commend the Canadian Navy for its renewed efforts to combat hate and extremism in their ranks and for the decision by Naval chain of command to pursue a release of an individual with deep and longstanding ties to neo-Nazi groups and activities,” said Jaime Kirzner-Roberts, Director of Policy at FSWC, in a news release.

As a supporter of the neo-Nazi terrorist organization Blood and Honour, Mihajlovic was found to have used the neo-Nazi website Iron March to call for a “race war” and offer to sell weapons to white supremacists.

He was suspended from the reserves earlier this year but was reinstated in July after telling commanders he had been rehabilitated by his time in the forces and no longer held racist views.

A senior Navy official told FSWC that Mihajlovic has been informed of the chain of command’s recommendation and will have the opportunity to make representations during an administrative review. That review, which will be independent of his chain of command, will be considered by the Director of Military Careers and Administration, after which a final decision will be made.

At the same time, the commander of the Army has promised to remove a soldier from the famed Canadian Rangers who, according to the CBC, has a history of involvement with the white supremacist group Soldiers of Odin.

Army commander Lieutenant-General Wayne Eyre has promised that Master Corporal Erik Myggland will be out of the Armed Forces “within weeks.”

A Forces spokesperson told the CJR on Dec. 10 that it’s estimated Myggland’s release will be finalized next month.

Meantime, “we simply must ensure he is afforded the same treatment as any other member whom we intend to release. The details of this process related to any particular case are protected under the Privacy Act, so we cannot comment further,” stated spokesperson Major Karina Holder.

The Forces remain committed “to the elimination of hateful conduct and has taken strong measures to equip our leaders with the ability to do so,” Holder said.

The Canadian Army Order on Hateful Conduct “makes everyone’s obligations clear at all levels and we have distributed this policy widely across the [Forces], including sharing it with stakeholder groups, posting it to the [internet] and promoting it on our social media channels.”

The decision on Myggland was also welcomed by FSWC.

“We support and appreciate this decision by the Canadian Army to finally remove an individual involved in far-right activity and hateful conduct from its ranks, a decision that sends a message that those who are involved in hate groups and activity are not welcome in the military,” stated FSWC president and CEO Michael Levitt.

In a later statement to the CJR, Sajjan said, “Canadians expect every member who wears the maple leaf on their shoulder to uphold our values, both at home and abroad. If an individual does not believe in values of Canadians and instead promotes hate and intolerance, there is no place for that person in the Canadian Armed Forces.”

FSWC has urged the government to adopt a zero-tolerance policy that includes quick dismissal of any members found to be involved in extremist activity.

Editorial: Time to Act on Online Hate, Radicalization

Nov. 19, 2020

With the defeat of Donald Trump, one hopes that along with him, lies, the incessant daily drama, and most of all, the wild conspiracy theorists, will go with him.

Trump has changed the face of facts, and it could be that there’s no going back. However, this does not mean we are powerless in the face of conspiratorial lies that have led to angry, hostile and racist words, dangerous targeted assaults, and even murder.

Here in Canada, online conspiracy theories, white supremacist-led hate and groups advocating violence have been identified by national security services in this country and the United States as the single most dangerous domestic threat in North America.

Here at home, since 2018, 18 Canadians have been murdered as a result of individuals radicalized online to far-right philosophies.

The extremists include Alek Minassian, currently on trial for the murder of 10 people in a van ramming rampage in 2018. Minassian identifies as an “Incel,” or an “involuntary celibate.”

“Incels” are boys and young men who blame their barren sex lives on women. Their rage has been institutionalized online, mostly on far-right extremist websites. When they find each other in the dark recesses of social media, murder of women is the topic of choice.

Minassian is not the only “incel” in Canada to have been charged with murder. In May 2020, a 17-year-old Toronto juvenile was charged in the machete murder of a young woman. It is believed that he was radicalized online to incel philosophy.

In February 2019, Alexandre Bissonnette was found guilty of the murder of six Canadian Muslims at prayer in a mosque near Quebec City two years earlier. During sentencing, the judge ruled the murders were motivated by “visceral hatred toward Muslims.”

According to evidence at his trial, just prior to the mosque attack, Bissonnette was online 819 times, clicking on posts related to Trump’s travel ban against Muslim-majority countries, and white nationalists sites with similar themes.

Only a few months ago Guilherme (William) Von Neutegem was charged in the murder of Mohamed-Aslim Zafis, a Canadian Muslim outside his mosque in Toronto. Research has revealed that Von Neutegem may have been involved with the “Order of the 9 Angels,” which has been described as a neo-Nazi death cult whose mission is to “cull humans.”

It’s well past time for action on the use of social media as a tool for racists to plan murder, mayhem and insurrection. In a welcome development, the Inter-Parliamentary Task Force to Combat Online Antisemitism hosted its first meeting this month, with leading Jewish organizations from Canada, Australia, and the United States providing recommendations for what actions legislators should take to address the issue.

While they do that, our fear is that more young people looking for answers will find them, as have others who have been manipulated into murderous racist rages that go beyond anti-Semitism to Islamophobia and misogyny.

We have much work to do, not the least of which is to begin recognizing the problem and developing strategies to halt the spread of online radicalization before more carnage occurs. Governments tell us that help and change is on the way. It cannot happen soon enough.

Police Probe Neo-Nazi Posters

July 16, 2020 – Waterloo Regional Police have confirmed to Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center (FSWC) that an investigation is underway after neo-Nazi posters were found in Kitchener, Ont. and shared on social media by local residents. 

The posters promote a website calling itself the “official media source for the Folkish Resistance Movement, a National Socialist political organization based primarily out of North America.”

The posters include messages such as “smash white guilt,” “love not hate” with the word “love” including a swastika and the word “hate” including a Star of David; and “break debt slavery” with an image of a man breaking a chain that includes a Star of David, alluding to a longstanding antisemitic trope about Jewish control over banking and finance.

“We are urging police to conduct a thorough investigation into these posters to identify and charge the perpetrators and send a message that such hateful propaganda will not be tolerated in Kitchener or anywhere else,” said Jaime Kirzner-Roberts, director of FSWC’s Campaign Against Antisemitism.

EDITORIAL: Elections Canada Must Shut Down Neo-Nazi Parties

July 15, 2020 – Trevor Patron is at it again. This obscure Prairie citizen from Redvers, Sask., has doubled down on his antisemitism.

From a low last year, when he railed against the “parasitic tribe” (read: Jews) for all of Canada’s imagined problems, this week, in another outburst of Jew-hatred, Patron is calling for the expulsion of Jews from the country. His screed regurgitates the pattern of all past antisemites who sought the ouster of Jews from their midst.

But this is not news. In fact, Patron would not even be worth a mention if it weren’t for this: He is the leader of a political party officially recognized by Elections Canada.

That’s right. In September 2019, Stephane Perrault, Canada’s Chief Electoral Officer, informed Patron that the Canadian Nationalist Party (CNP) had become a registered political party in Canada.

“Your party now has all the rights, privileges and responsibilities of a registered party under the Canada Elections Act,” Perrault wrote Patron.

This permits Patron’s fledgling band of ne’er-do-wells to run in federal elections and to receive a 75 percent tax return on any donation to the party.

(It might be some consolation to know that the CNP fielded three candidates in the last federal election and received 284 votes in total; statistically, zero percent of ballots cast).

Equally as important, Patron, as a result of a complaint laid by the Canadian Anti-Hate Network (CAHN) on June 26, 2019 (full disclosure: Bernie Farber, publisher of the CJR is chair of CAHN) to the Saskatchewan RCMP, Patron has been under investigation for promotion of hatred against Jews for over a year.

Yes, you read that, too, correctly: Since June of last year.

It seems incredible that the RCMP has been unable since then to reach a conclusion as to whether Patron has breached section 319 of Canada’s Criminal Code, which plainly outlines what public incitement to hatred is.

We would argue that Patron’s unsubtle words and deeds surely warrant quick and deliberate findings.

Following the June 2019 CAHN complaint, B’nai Brith Canada also wrote to the RCMP declaring its outrage, and yet the investigation continues.

Last week, following Patron’s second video, the CAHN sent another letter to the RCMP:

Dear Constable Howe,

Further to my criminal complaint against Travis PATRON filed 26 June 2019, I am writing to bring to your attention further anti-Jewish material that PATRON has published today through his Canadian Nationalist Party Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pg/NationalistCA/posts/) again repeatedly referring to Jews as parasites, members of the “synagogue of Satan,” that Jews control the central banks, and that they “infect the body politic like a parasite.”

The apparent pamphlet ends with the call, “And what we need to do, perhaps more than anything, is remove these people once-and-for-all from our country.”

I understand that criminal hate propaganda complaints are not commonplace, but the community as a whole and our Jewish brothers and sisters especially have the right to be protected from this corrosive poison and threats in a timely manner.  These are the types of messages that have already been found to meet the test for breaching the Criminal Code.

I urge the RCMP in the strongest possible terms to charge Travis PATRON under s. 319(2) of the Criminal Code for the wilful promotion of hatred against the Jewish community.

I look forward to hearing from you as soon as possible,

Richard Warman
Barrister and Solicitor
Ottawa

This past week both the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) along with Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre, have followed the lead of CAHN and laid complaints with Saskatchewan RCMP.

The time has come. Canada should be following the example set by Germany, which has developed law ensuring that anti-democratic groups may not gain official political party status.

While Patron and company have displayed almost no political support, it takes far less for those with hate in their hearts to create havoc. Neo-Nazis ought not to be given any respect in this country, and those who violate Canadian hate law should be charged.