Suspect Identified in Vaughan Antisemitic Incidents

Sept. 29, 2020 – Investigators with the York Regional Police Hate Crime Unit are appealing for assistance to locate a man wanted in connection with multiple hate-motivated incidents in the City of Vaughan.

On Sept. 18, officers responded to a call for a hate-motivated incident in the area of New Westminster Drive and Steeles Avenue. According to a statement from York Regional Police, the caller had been driving his vehicle when a suspect not known to him began yelling antisemitic remarks. The victim recorded the suspect, who approached the vehicle and “attempted to assault him,” police say.

Investigators believe this event is connected to six other incidents that began on Sept. 18 involving graffiti found on garage doors and vehicles on Mullen Drive.

Police believe the graffiti were hate-motivated. They referenced both the Black and Jewish communities.

Kurt Edwards
Kurt Edwards

Investigators have identified the suspect as Kurt Edwards, 43, of no fixed address, and a warrant has been issued for his arrest. Anyone with information on his location, or information on the incidents, is asked to contact investigators.

“The accused is urged to seek legal advice and turn himself in,” say police.

“York Regional Police does not tolerate hate crime in any form,” said the statement. “Those who victimize individuals based on race, national or ethnic origin, language, colour, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or mental or physical disability will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

Anyone with information can contact the York Regional Police #4 District Criminal Investigation Bureau at 1-866-876-5423, ext. 7441, Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS, leave an anonymous tip online at www.1800222tips.com.

Easing of COVID Restrictions = More Hate Graffiti

Sept. 17, 2020 – By STEVE ARNOLD

Hamilton police are reporting a rise in antisemitic hate graffiti as COVID lockdowns ease.

Det. Paul Corrigan, head of the Hamilton Police Service’s hate crimes unit, said reported incidents have risen in the last three weeks after lagging sharply for several months.

Corrigan added that while the year-over-year number is still down sharply from 2019, likely because of COVID-related lockdowns, the recent increase is still of concern.

“The reason we’re seeing an uptick is because it had been reasonably quiet for a while with people locked down because of COVID,” he said. “It’s not an increase over normal times, it’s just an increase over abnormal times.

“I’m no statistical expert, but I’m guessing it’s because of COVID,” he added.

To date, 42 hate crimes have been reported in Hamilton, compared to over 80 for the same period last year. Jews were the targets of 15, or 36 percent, of those incidents. Of that total, 14 were graffiti incidents. Only one, a minor assault in January with antisemitic insults thrown in, involved a serious crime. That case is still before the courts.

The most recent incident occurred over the Labour Day weekend in the Dundas neighbourhood of Greensville, a collection of higher-end homes atop the Niagara escarpment. Three swastikas were drawn on roadways, shocking residents out enjoying the last long weekend of the summer.

Resident Kristin Glasbergen told CBC she saw one of the hate symbols while out for a morning stroll and another two days later.

“I called the city to let them know and I posted on Facebook to let the community there know,” she said. “This doesn’t happen in Greensville.”

David Arbuckle, another area resident, told CBC he was “shocked and disgusted that someone took the opportunity to purposely spread a message of hate in our community.”

Reactions like that are common, Corrigan said, and it’s a chief reason he classifies something a swastika chalked onto a roadway as a hate crime.

“Some police services don’t look at that as a hate crime. They see it as a criminal offense of graffiti, but I look at the swastika as a symbol of hate,” he said. “I know the argument that it’s a peace symbol to a Buddhist, but when I see a swastika, I see it as criminal and there is a hate-bias motivation to it.”

While that approach may give some the impression Hamilton is a hate-filled place, Corrigan said he will continue to rate incidents that way until the federal government comes up with a national definition.

In 2019, Hamilton was dubbed the “Hate Crime Capital” of Canada after Statistics Canada figures showed that hate crimes in the city the year before were up 6.6 per cent against a national decrease of 13 percent.

With reported incidents averaging 17.1 per 100,000 people, the rate in Hamilton was more than three times the national average.

Jews remain near the top of the list as targets of such crimes.

Hate crime in Hamilton and area continued through 2019. In Burlington, for example, two men were charged after six antisemitic incidents were reported in May and June.

In those cases hateful messages were posted on the front door of Burlington City Hall, on streetlamp posts, and private vehicles.

Just as charges were laid in the Burlington incidents, members of Hamilton’s Beth Jacob Congregation arrived for Shabbat morning services last Oct. 5 to find four hate messages crudely scrawled in their parking lot and on the street in front of the synagogue.

The drawings included a swastika, and the word “Jews” crossed-out in a circle.

While local police services grapple with the problem of crudely-drawn hate symbols aimed at Jews, B’nai Brith Canada is urging the federal government to use its upcoming Speech from the Throne to bring in new legislation to deal with antisemitism.

In a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, B’nai Brith CEO Michael Mostyn said COVID has “accelerated the bitterness of attacks faced by the Jewish community,” and called for a national action plan to combat antisemitism.

The plan, Mostyn wrote, should include standardized and mandatory school programs on antisemitism and the Holocaust overseen by a new official reporting directly to the prime minister.

Mostyn argued Canada should now take “practical steps” to implement the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition of anti-Semitism, which Ottawa adopted last year as part of an anti-racism plan.

“We believe the government should emphasize that addressing racism, antisemitism, hate speech and hate crimes is a public safety issue, not just a multicultural issue and that combating these is one end of the spectrum of countering radicalization to violence,” he wrote.

Mostyn also urged Ottawa to pour resources into digital literacy programs; to refuse diplomatic engagement with Iran unless it accepts Israel’s right to exist; declaring the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps a terrorist organization; denying funding to UNRWA, the UN agency overseeing Palestinian refugees; deporting Nazi war criminals like Helmut Oberlander; and ratifying the 2002 Convention on Cybercrime that criminalizes online racism.

Vulnerable Communities Get Boost to Combat Hate Crimes

July 24, 2020 – By STEVE ARNOLD

Programs aimed at combating hate crimes are getting a $1.7 million boost from the provincial government.

That’s what Premier Doug Ford’s government is making available in the latest distribution under the Safer and Vital Communities program.

Over the next two years, non-profit community agencies and First Nation band councils with a focus on hate crime will be able to apply for money in conjunction with local police departments and other community agencies.

In a news release announcing the fund, Sylvia Jones, Solicitor General and Minister Responsible for Anti-Racism, said the funds are an effort to find creative ways of dealing with the problem.

“Our government has zero tolerance for hate, racism and discrimination in all forms,” Jones said. “Effective solutions cannot come from government alone and the Safer and Vital Communities grant will allow community-based organizations to be full partners in the fight against hate in Ontario.”

To be eligible, groups must address hate-motivated crime in their community through programs and strategies. Applications could include recreational programs that positively affect the development of children and youth, raising awareness of hate-motivated crimes, as well as the improvement of security infrastructure. Successful applicants and projects will be announced in the winter of 2021.

Applications are open until Sept. 16.

The Safer Communities program operates on a two-year cycle. The last time grants were made to agencies such as Agincourt Community Services Association, Canadian Mental Association in Peel-Dufferin, Community Living Essex County, London Abused Women’s Centre and others.

The program was launched in 2004.

In a news release, Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs Toronto chair Barbara Bank welcomed the money as an “investment which will make a meaningful difference in the lives of all Ontarians who visit their local houses of worship or community centres which collectively spend millions of dollars every year on security costs.

“It is vital that all levels of government recognize that safety and security should not be a burden on vulnerable groups alone,” stated Bank. “As Canadians, we must ensure that all communities – no matter their race, religion, sex, or orientation – can carry out their communal activities without fear for their safety.”

The funding announcement “follows sustained [Jewish] community advocacy on the issue of community security.”

CIJA reminded that in 2018, Jewish Canadians formed one percent of Canada’s population but were the target of nearly 20 percent of all hate crimes in the country.